What’s the plan for your estate?

What’s the plan for your estate?

  • Split between family and charity

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Give all to charity

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Leave it to SVTP

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    60
  • Poll closed .

jeffh81

Here’s KingBlack
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Sep 4, 2015
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8,865
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Home
The wife will get my stuff. I told her to sell whatever she didn’t want to keep and not to let my family near my guns
 

phil a

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Joined
Aug 8, 2006
Messages
146
Location
Toledo, OH
I’m not scared of Indian doctors but I have seen enough of them to know they are total shit.

I’m sure that not everyone wants to be a doctor, but it was one example.

The reason that most kids want to “build things” is because that’s what they learn outside of school, or watching tv ie American Chopper, and it’s much more feasible than anything they’re learning in school.

I repeat, doctor is just one example, but glad you’re fine with your daughters being their receptionist bitches for a little over minimum wage.

I don’t understand this thinking. I work with and trained with many ‘Indian doctors,’ and to say they are total shit is not just incorrect it’s plain ignorant. Sorry man, I just don’t see how you can say something like that without providing any basis. Are you in medicine? Do you know what is involved in medical training, residency requirements for specialties, etc? Did you have multiple bad experiences that made you feel this way?

If someone foreign-born wants to practice here, they complete the same residency program everyone else does.

It’s true that medical education is lengthy and expensive. You don’t have to have a single dollar to be accepted - that’s why there are loans. It’s something to understand prior to deciding to go to school. Do I wish it was free or much, much cheaper? Definitely! But it’s not, and no one forces anyone (aside from a stereotypical parent here and there...) to do it.

On the topic, everything goes to wife/kids. Car goes to my brother, though God knows what he’d do with it...lol
 

Turkey_Lurker03

Active Member
Established Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2013
Messages
367
Location
MD
Wife & I planed ours with her attorneys after our first son was born. Forgot who gets the money, but my son would get my mustang and hot wheel collection. (Have thousands unopened from when I was a kid)

Too bad we had another boy 22 months later and never updated the will so I'm guessing he gets screwed unless we have an addendum drawn up?

Ironic thing is the oldest (8)could care less about car stuff & youngest(6) loves my mustang and car stuff like me so prob should get on that...

Although youngest is a wild animal so the thought of him wheeling around showing off is scary...






Sent from my SM-G988U using the svtperformance.com mobile app
 

JimCSHO

Well-Known Member
Established Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2016
Messages
344
Location
Winston Salem, NC
Wife & I planed ours with her attorneys after our first son was born. Forgot who gets the money, but my son would get my mustang and hot wheel collection. (Have thousands unopened from when I was a kid)

Too bad we had another boy 22 months later and never updated the will so I'm guessing he gets screwed unless we have an addendum drawn up?

Ironic thing is the oldest (8)could care less about car stuff & youngest(6) loves my mustang and car stuff like me so prob should get on that...

Although youngest is a wild animal so the thought of him wheeling around showing off is scary...






Sent from my SM-G988U using the svtperformance.com mobile app

In my experience as an estate planning attorney, and now as a trust administrator, this is unfortunately common. People do the estate plan and say, "whew, that is done" and put it on the shelf. After a few years the circumstances change but no one thinks about updating the plan which is now horribly out-of-date (both for goals of the client as well as for any changes in the law). When the plan "matures" (our way of saying, hey, the client just died) we get to manage the fall out among the survivors, who now don't talk to each other again.

That's also why I always stress to students when I teach at the law school that the most important thing for the attorney is to always be asking and considering the "what if" questions. A good estate planning attorney should have asked, "what if you have more children, what should be done with the Mustang and Hot Wheels that you just specifically gave?"
 

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