Tempted to buy a mach-e gt

CobraBob

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Used Subaru, Mazda, Toyota, or Honda with 150K.

Reliable enough, but not too nice. Gotta work hard for nice shit, rather than having mommy and daddy just give you nice shit right from the start. It'll make them appreciate working hard and upgrading on their own nickel and hard work later in life. Never spoil your kids; it ruins them.
Umm, that is not a simple fact. Truth is, teach your children responsibility, appreciation, and the value of money/things, and if you have the means to buy them a new car they will likely appreciate it and treat it with proper respect. Very different from giving a "spoiled" (as in a child who lacks the traits above) child a nice car where they might abuse it or worse. Good parenting prepares children for their adulthood. Here's another point. Many adults won't buy a used car because they are concerned about the overall condition or if there was something wrong with it that resulted in a sale or trade-in. So many parents might feel the same way about their teen's first car. I know someone on SVTP who bought his son a nice car when he was 16-17. The son was very appreciative of the gift and was very responsible with it. He was by no means "spoiled" nor felt entitled to it. His dad could afford it, and wanted him to drive a new car. Nothing wrong with that. There's no hard, set rule here IMO. Every situation is unique, but great parenting is such a key factor.
 

Relaxed Chaos

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Umm, that is not a simple fact. Truth is, teach your children responsibility, appreciation, and the value of money/things, and if you have the means to buy them a new car they will likely appreciate it and treat it with proper respect. Very different from giving a "spoiled" (as in a child who lacks the traits above) child a nice car where they might abuse it or worse. Good parenting prepares children for their adulthood. Here's another point. Many adults won't buy a used car because they are concerned about the overall condition or if there was something wrong with it that resulted in a sale or trade-in. So many parents might feel the same way about their teen's first car. I know someone on SVTP who bought his son a nice car when he was 16-17. The son was very appreciative of the gift and was very responsible with it. He was by no means "spoiled" nor felt entitled to it. His dad could afford it, and wanted him to drive a new car. Nothing wrong with that. There's no hard, set rule here IMO. Every situation is unique, but great parenting is such a key factor.

I stand by what I said. Psychological entitlement is real and is particularly evil in the formative years, well intentioned and taught or not.

How do you think our society developed this entitlement poison running through our society? Good intentioned parents that want to feel good instead of doing tangible good.

Don't spoil your kids. Make them work for everything worthwhile.
 

JB85

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JB85

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Umm, that is not a simple fact. Truth is, teach your children responsibility, appreciation, and the value of money/things, and if you have the means to buy them a new car they will likely appreciate it and treat it with proper respect. Very different from giving a "spoiled" (as in a child who lacks the traits above) child a nice car where they might abuse it or worse. Good parenting prepares children for their adulthood. Here's another point. Many adults won't buy a used car because they are concerned about the overall condition or if there was something wrong with it that resulted in a sale or trade-in. So many parents might feel the same way about their teen's first car. I know someone on SVTP who bought his son a nice car when he was 16-17. The son was very appreciative of the gift and was very responsible with it. He was by no means "spoiled" nor felt entitled to it. His dad could afford it, and wanted him to drive a new car. Nothing wrong with that. There's no hard, set rule here IMO. Every situation is unique, but great parenting is such a key factor.
I agree with this. I technically had the nicest car in my high school. I was not spoiled, nor were were rich by any means. But my dad and I bought a 1969 cougar for $500 when I was 8 years old. Took us 8 years, every day and night to restore it and complete it by the time I was 16. The amount of care and responsibility I have for this car was leagues above any other kid at school that was just handed a BMW. All those spoiled kids with parents handing them BMW's, toyota Tacoma's (that was all the rave back in 2003 when I was a senior), and brand new jettas, all got wrecked because the kids didnt care. There wasnt a week where I didnt wash and wax this car. I also still have the car to this day
 

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Klaus

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looks like it is a UK stat. But it is still the safest care on the road anywhere in the world.

There are 50k on the road in the UK. The auto fatality rate in the UK is 2 per 100k drivers. 0 per 50 k is not impressive, especially considering all sorts of bias in the data. For instance, higher income are less likely to die in an auto accident and volvo owners are more likely to be higher income.
 

Klaus

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re: Mach E. A colleague bought one of these and drove it from Des Moines to Minneapolis. Range is supposed to be 280 and the trip is 240. He had to make an emergency stop at 180 miles for a 40 minute charge. Sign me up.
 

CobraBob

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I stand by what I said. Psychological entitlement is real and is particularly evil in the formative years, well intentioned and taught or not.

How do you think our society developed this entitlement poison running through our society? Good intentioned parents that want to feel good instead of doing tangible good.

Don't spoil your kids. Make them work for everything worthwhile.
And.....I'll stand by what I said.
 

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