• Welcome to SVTPerformance!

FOR THE PLAIN UNVARNISHED HELL OF IT.

Discussion in 'Road Side Pub' started by VRYALT3R3D, Mar 5, 2021.

  1. VRYALT3R3D

    VRYALT3R3D Well-Known Member Established Member

    Messages:
    5,451
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2012
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    By Peter M. DeLorenzo

    Detroit. While the Sturm und Drang continues over the transition to Battery Electric Vehicles, the pushback from people who either don’t believe it will ever happen or don’t believe that it should happen seems to be gaining strength by the day. The reasons are many: The infrastructure isn’t there and won’t be there for years to come. Range continues to be a perceived problem. Charging remains an issue, both for the time it takes and because it in fact excludes apartment dwellers en masse. The list goes on from there. Some people are just disinclined to entertain BEVs under any circumstance, when it comes right down to it.

    And I get it, I really do. As someone who grew up immersed in some of the finest high-performance ICE machines ever built, envisioning a world that doesn’t echo with the sound of hungry V8s rumbling across the landscape is simply hard to imagine.

    But then again, as I’ve said repeatedly, those machines will be around for decades to come. They will be collected, nurtured and preserved indefinitely. And that is a very good thing from my perspective.

    And I’m not calling it “The Grand Transition” for nothing. It’s not as if your local Donuts, Lotto ‘n Gas station is going to disappear overnight, taken over by charging islands. It is going to take time. A long time. But it’s also clear that for a large portion of the driving population, BEVs will become a staple in every geographical region here in the United States. And I am fine with that.

    But even with BEVs, I see the car “thing” continuing. The onset of BEVs doesn’t mean that the car “thing” will go away. In fact, it might be a good time to take a step back and understand what this car “thing” has meant to this nation.

    How did the car “thing” evolve from desiring faster horses, to the building of transportation that transformed the world? What propelled the automobile from being an extravagant convenience to a cultural touchstone that’s such an inexorable part of the American fabric that even the most hostile of the anti-car hordes can’t seem to dampen our collective enthusiasm for it?

    Is it the fashion statement? The fundamental sense of motion and speed? The image-enhancing power that automobiles possess? Or all of the above?

    If anything, I keep going back to the one thing that’s undeniable about our collective love for the automobile, the one thing that no computer simulation - no matter how powerful or creatively enhanced - can compete with. And that is the freedom of mobility. And that will not change in the upcoming BEV era.

    The ability to go and do, coupled with the freedom to explore and experience is not only a powerful concept, it is fundamental to the human experience, which is why the automobile in all of its forms remains so compelling and undeniably intoxicating.

    That the automobile has progressed from a device built around convenience and comfort to something more, much more, is easy to understand. The rush of freedom that we’ve all experienced in our first solo drives in an automobile is something that cannot be duplicated or brushed aside. It is ingrained in our spirit and etched in our souls.

    I have talked to the most strident anti-car people over the years. But even for those who merely like to inform me that “I’m not into cars” inevitably, after acknowledging that it’s fine that they don’t share my passion for the automobile, something very interesting happens.

    If the conversation is allowed to percolate long enough, every single anti-car person I have encountered in going on twenty-two years of doing Autoextremist.com comes around to saying something like, “Well, there was this one car that my uncle (or aunt, or friend, or brother, or father, or grandfather, etc.) had that I’ll never forget…” And they then proceed to tell me about a car that is so indelibly carved in their memories that they start talking about it in detail, including where they were, how old they were, who was with them, where they were going, what happened, etc., etc., etc.

    For even those most dispassionate about the automobile – at least on the surface anyway – I find there are always stories if you dig a little deeper. Stories of coming of age, of adventure, of harrowing close calls, of love, and life and lives lived. And memories. Countless, colorful memories that live on forever.

    The automobile business itself can be mind-numbingly tedious at times, as I’ve well-documented over the years. And it is without question one of the most complicated endeavors on earth, made up of so many nuanced ingredients that it almost defies description. But the creation of machines that are safe, reliable, beautiful to look at, fun to drive, versatile or hard working – depending on the task they’re designed for – is more than just a cold, calculated business. It is and has been an industrial art form that has come to define who we are collectively.

    The automobile obviously means more to me than it does for most. I grew up immersed in this business, and the passionate endeavor surrounding the creation of automotive art has never stopped being interesting for me. And it is very much art, by the way. Emotionally involving and undeniably compelling mechanical art that not only takes us where we want to go but moves us in ways that still touches our souls deeply.

    As I’ve reminded everyone many times over the years, I for one will never forget the essence of the machine, and what makes it a living, breathing mechanical conduit of our hopes and dreams.

    One of our favorite pieces of automotive prose was written by poet, critic and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, James Agee. It appeared in a piece he wrote for Fortune in September 1934. You can read the entire passage below, but this is the part of it that resonates the most for us:

    "Whatever we may think, we move for no better reason than for the plain unvarnished hell of it. And there is no better reason.”

    For the plain unvarnished hell of it, indeed.

    And that’s the High-Electron Truth for this week. Rants - Autoextremist.com ~ the bare-knuckled, unvarnished, high-electron truth...
     
    Captain Beyond and quad like this.
  2. BrunotheBoxer

    BrunotheBoxer POWERLIFTING MASTER RACE Established Member

    Messages:
    8,269
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Location:
    Brockton
    Thread was so good I'm reading it a second time.
     
  3. RedVenom48

    RedVenom48 Ghost Editor-in-Chief Premium Member Established Member Beer Money Bros.

    Messages:
    7,560
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2014
    Location:
    Arizona
    Grid over load, sky high electric rates, range, battery charge time, charging stations as prevalent as.gas stations.

    Until all of those are solved so its cheaper and more convenient than liquid fuel powered automobiles, with no hit to energy rates and no detriment to power grid integrity, only then will EV be a real choice.

    It will never be more environmentally friendly. That's a fallacy that tree huggers and liberals masturbate to so they feel more correct in their lunacy.
     
    Dirks9901, VRYALT3R3D and PhoenixM3 like this.
  4. bluebosss197

    bluebosss197 Salami snackbar! Established Member

    Messages:
    2,144
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2010
    Location:
    I is a Texan
    Reminder that this push for electric vehicles is by politicians who have a vested interest in rare earth metal mineral rights and want to see their investment through.
     
  5. quad

    quad Well-Known Member Established Member

    Messages:
    5,717
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2004
    Location:
    Detroit
    Yes that's a good point about apartment dwellers not being able to easily charge electric vehicles. I don't see how they could completely phase out gasoline vehicles. What if the electrical grid fails? Look at Texas recently. You'll be charging your car off a gas generator lol!

    Can a Portable Generator Charge a Tesla?
    https://generatorgrid.com/blog/tesla/
     
  6. VRYALT3R3D

    VRYALT3R3D Well-Known Member Established Member

    Messages:
    5,451
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2012
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    The government is essentially mandating the market share instead of letting the free market work. The car companies are forced to comply.
     
    DAVESVT2000 and mikecr50 like this.
  7. HEMIHUNTER

    HEMIHUNTER Well-Known Member Established Member

    Messages:
    5,841
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Location:
    florida
    Iseewhatudidthere.


    Sent from my iPhone using the svtperformance.com mobile app
     
    BrunotheBoxer likes this.

Share This Page