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Big Bore Details | Ford's Godzilla (7X) V8 Engine | Plus a New Name

Discussion in 'Front Page Articles' started by SID297, Jul 18, 2018.

  1. SID297

    SID297 OWNER/ADMIN Staff Member Administrator

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    Big Bore Details | Ford's Godzilla (7X) V8 Engine | Plus a New Name
    Ford_7X_P4_004.jpg

    In our previous Ford 7X Engine Article we mentioned that we have a bit more insider information to share. While this some of this info is single source, I have been able to confirm a good deal of it as completely accurate. I am 100% certain that the engine is a 2-Valve Pushrod V8 with Aluminum Cylinder Heads. They will carry on with the Ford tradition of being clamped to the block with 4 Bolts around each cylinder. It is going to be direct injected, and it will be built at Ford’s Windsor, ON Canada Engine Plant.

    Ford_7X_P4_002.jpg
    The 7X's rocker mounts are very similar to those found on this GM head. Though the Ford castings appear more intricately yet robustly designed.

    But wait, there’s more. We’ve also received some information about the engine block. While I can’t confirm these figures at this time we have been told that the Godzilla V8 has a 4.11-Inch Bore. With the help of a little 4th Grade math (V=π r² h, solving for h) and working backwards from that figure and the displacement we calculated that ‘Zilla should have a 4.19-Inch Stroke. That’s pretty much a square engine, which would make it very “trucky”.

    Ford_7X_P4_005.jpg
    This is the 6.2L Ford V8. As you can see, the iron block is quite beefy.

    We’ve also been told that the 7X Engine Block will have a 4.527-Inch Bore Spacing. Coincidentally, that figure is identical to the outgoing SOHC 6.2L Boss/Hurricane V8. Considering that the 6.2L, found in the 1st Generation SVT F-150 Raptor, had a 4.015-Inch Bore and a 3.740-Inch Stroke it would appear that Godzilla can be seen as a Stroked and Poked Boss. It makes financial sense to utilize engineering, and possibly tooling, that has already been paid for. Being that cost savings appears to be a driving factor in the Godzilla Engine Program, I would have to say that all that inside info seems plausible.

    Ford_7X_P4_012.jpg
    The 7X heads are a good deal more compact that the SOHC ones found on the 6.2L.

    With the Bore Spacing being over 4.5-Inches I believe it would be safe to call this engine something other than a Small Block (perhaps M/S Block?). GM’s LS/LT engines feature a 4.4-Inch Bore Spacing, and the Mopar HEMI Series rings in at 4.46-Inches. So Godzilla appears to be a shade larger than both of those, not to mention the Modular Series’ puny 3.937-Inch Bore Spacing. Big Blocks typically come in around 4.8 inches, so it definitely looks like we’re not getting a new generation of BBF v8.

    Ford_7X_P4_001.jpg
    This is the GM LT-Series DI-V8. It will be interesting to see how similar the finished 7X will look.

    Word also has that the block will feature Cross-Bolted Main bearing Caps, which is another 6.2L V8 feature. To be fair, Ford has been almost exclusively building Deep-Skirt Cross-Bolted blocks for nearly 30-years (the 2.7L EcoBoost is a significant outlier). I grew up wanting basically anything powered by a 427 SOHC Big-Block, and there’s a possibility that I may be able to piece together and odd-ball modern version of it. But that is a story for another time.

    Ford_7X_P4_011.jpg
    It seems to be nearly a certainty that Godzilla will have a deep-skirt cross-bolted-main block like other Ford engines.

    Now for, let’s engage in a little speculation on compression ratios. The F-150’s 5.0 Coyote V8, which features both Port and Direct Fuel Injection systems, comes in with 12:1 compression. That seems to be a trend among manufactures of DI NA-Engines, as most seem to be right around 12:1. It’s probably safe to assume that the 7X will be something close to that, or possibly a bit lower. Engines designed to work hard tend to have slightly lower compression ratios to lower cylinder pressures and increase longevity. However, with advancements in technology (fuel and ignition control) and materials (ring, bearings, and pistons) this trend seems to be giving way to more squeeze.

    Ford_7X_P4_003.jpg
    Get ready for more compression. The 7.3L is going to be several points higher than the outgoing 6.2L.

    Finally, according to our source the final displacement of the engine will not be the familiar 444 Cubic Inches from the Legendary 7.3L Powerstroke (also known as the International DT-444E) of years gone-by. Instead, this all Ford V8 will displace 445 Cubic Inches. Considering where Godzilla is going to be built perhaps we should start calling it the 445 Windsor?

    Ford_7X_P4_006.jpg
    I'm hoping the 7X will keep the piston oil squirters found in the 6.2L Boss/Hurricane V8 and the 6.7L Powerstroke Diesel.

    We are still working to gather more information, particularly about the block and crank materials. I have a feeling, given the industrial nature of this engine, that we’ll be seeing a Cast Iron block and a Cast Crank. Considering every other engine Ford produces it is almost a certainty that it will have Cast Pistons and Powdered Metal Rods. That doesn’t necessarily mean doom and gloom, as Ford has essentially perfected the use of those economical materials during the nearly 30 Year run of the Modular Engine Series. As soon as we have more concrete information to share you’ll find it right here on SVTP.

    -SID297
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2018
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  2. lexustech48

    lexustech48 I like Fords n stuff Premium Member Established Member

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    Hmmm... sounds like the modability of a cast crank, piston and PM rod is limited. Will be interested to see exactly what kind of power figures this engine is capable of in stock form. A little disappointed as cast and PM parts lessens the chance that it could survive boost reliably. At least in stock form.

    If its got good-for-stock power, torque and survives Ford's QA torture tests, Im still excited.
     
  3. merkyworks

    merkyworks Active Member Established Member

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    So would you call the block a SMBF? Shmedium Block Ford LOL
     
  4. SID297

    SID297 OWNER/ADMIN Staff Member Administrator

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    Time will tell. The 6.4L Powerstroke has PMR rods and cast pistons, and it doesn't have a problem holding power. It's all about the design. Since these engines are going to be expected to handle major abuse I suspect they will be somewhat overbuilt.
     
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  5. me32

    me32 BEASTLY SHELBY GT500 TVS Premium Member Established Member

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    Looks very promising. Glad you are keeping us updated. Do you think the block will be as strong as the 6.7?
     
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  6. SID297

    SID297 OWNER/ADMIN Staff Member Administrator

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    I doubt it, because it wouldn't be intended to make the same amount of power under similar load conditions.
     
  7. SID297

    SID297 OWNER/ADMIN Staff Member Administrator

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    Wanna see why the 445 Windsor will be popular? It doesn't need this $5,000 engine killing torpedo to meet emissions:

    Ford_7X_P4_007.jpg Ford_7X_P4_008.jpg
     
  8. lexustech48

    lexustech48 I like Fords n stuff Premium Member Established Member

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    oh sweet merciful... Apparently if your worksite lacks an industrial auger, you have one on your 6.7 exhaust? lmao Ill pass. Its not a matter of if but WHEN this thing fails...

    Ill give the Ford engineers credit, they found a way to make Diesel emissions compliant AND are near 1000 lbs of torque. That's impressive. I can see why the 7.3 and 6.0L Powerstrokes are still so sought after.
     
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  9. nofire

    nofire Sooner#65 Premium Member

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    That muffler is ludicrous.
     
  10. SID297

    SID297 OWNER/ADMIN Staff Member Administrator

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    Almost makes you miss the old 6.9 IDI. Almost.
     
  11. CGiron

    CGiron New Member

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    And no CGI in the block?
     
  12. me32

    me32 BEASTLY SHELBY GT500 TVS Premium Member Established Member

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    Thats what i was hoping for.
     
  13. MachME

    MachME 2V Power Established Member

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    So you're telling me, Ford, who began using a 4.6 cam in head in 91, is going to be releasing a iron block, aluminum head 7.0L pushrod motor in 2019+? There has to be a really important reason behind this motor.
     
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  14. SID297

    SID297 OWNER/ADMIN Staff Member Administrator

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    No word on that yet.
     
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  15. SID297

    SID297 OWNER/ADMIN Staff Member Administrator

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    7.3L. Cost, emissions, and duty cycle.
     
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  16. lexustech48

    lexustech48 I like Fords n stuff Premium Member Established Member

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    One of the biggest reasons this engine is in development is for the chassis cab market. U-Haul, Budget, motorhome builders etc have ALL been getting by with the tried and true 3v non-VCT V10. And while its been a good engine, its long in the tooth on power, emissions and size and they don't get nearly as good fuel economy as these companies would like to see.

    This new engine is being built to make torque and fit easily in more places while being up to date on emissions. Add into that its easier to service and teardown a pushrod engine than an OHC engine. Clearly, OHC engines can produce ridiculous power (Coyote, Condor, Trinity). But for lower RPM applications, pushrod is just fine.
     
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  17. SID297

    SID297 OWNER/ADMIN Staff Member Administrator

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    I may get my cylinder head engineer to write up a little story about the advantages of a 2 valve in low rpm applications.
     
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  18. xblitzkriegx

    xblitzkriegx Active Member Established Member

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    Easy, increased airflow for a given rpm due to valve area and better fuel atomization because io the stronger signal created from the piston.
     
  19. Beercules

    Beercules Active Member Established Member

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  20. lexustech48

    lexustech48 I like Fords n stuff Premium Member Established Member

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